UNPOPULAR SPEECH: WHY WE MUST PROTECT IT

Image result for HATE SPEECH

“As much as we hate it, we have to protect it.”


Hate speech is free speech, what some have stated. But whether we realize it or not, hate speech is protected under the United States constitution. But a large reason why we have to protect even hate speech, is because once we administration, america, artstart giving up the ability to talk freely, then what next. Another reason we
must protect all speech is because who makes the decision on what’s hate. I have things I define as hate speech, but not everybody sees it that way. I may think one of my political views is right, while someone else sees it as a hateful thing to stand behind. And conversely speaking, what I dislike and see as hate speech is fine by someone else.

But lets go back to why we must protect even hate speech. For starters, it’s Related imagehard to protect a verbal means of communication that is probably geared toward not liking you. Only problem is, once I form a coalition to stop these individuals from speaking, then how long will it be before my rights are trampled on. Meaning, former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick was seen Related imageas hateful for not standing for the national anthem at a football game. But political commentator Ann Coulter was seen as pushing hate speech and was banned from Berkley College’s campus. Both expressing a freedom of speech, and both protested.

 

Now, Ann is in a different position considering she is an independent worker and Colin played for a team, but nonetheless expressed their free speech. They both not only expressed their right, but also did so in alignment with the laws of the land. And yet, a conservative right and liberal left silenced them both. While at the same time screamed my own rights are Image result for bill of rightsbeing infringed upon. Which brings me to another reason you must protect all speech because we are losing our rights in America. But we’re willing to take them from each other. It’s not even the government intervention. We’re taking each other’s rights, spying on each other in hopes of finding anything to take someone else’s job.

Now, another issue is brought into light with why you can’t censor someone’s speech. And that is, what is hate speech really? I have my interpretation for what is hate speech. But that is just the key word, “interpretation.” What I like may be seen as hate speech, and what you Related imagefollow might be seen as hate speech. This is why all speech must be protected no matter how incendiary. Because what we define as hate speech is so broad and wide, we we must allow all speech. As a matter of fact a way to deal with hate speech is more speech around hate speech. And if it’s hateful, let the people show their faces. We don’t want them hiding in the background, we want them up front where we can see them.

And in the end that’s the biggest problem. The fact that we are actively trying to censor people just because we disagree is so arrogant. Because it assumes we, as the person censoring them, have all the right answers. And Low Section of Man Against Skywe don’t because my truth and fact might be different as time progress. And
that next generation’s truth changes as well. So with so much changing in our society, we have no choice but to open up the forum for conversation. And if you disagree, how about the right to be offended. Yet it still never sinks in, until it’s too late. And by the time it’s too late, we’ve all would have already relinquished control; and it’ll be our own fault.


https://www.facebook.com/groups/1777548702458281/

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/freedomless-speech/x/11885908#/

https://faheemjackson.squarespace.com/ (PERSONAL WEBSITE)

https://www.facebook.com/fjacks063 (FAN PAGE)

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_n_0?fst=as%3Aoff&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3Afaheem+jackson&keywords=faheem+jackson&ie=UTF8&qid=1492966094&rnid=2941120011   

@fjackson12345 Instagram

@2320howe Twitter

Advertisements

Author: faheemjackson44

I am from Racine, Wisconsin where I was raised until I graduated high school back in the year 2006. That entire time growing up in my mother's house, I was a student athlete. My goal was to embark on a general business career or athletics. But injuries through sports stopped a sports path, so I decided upon business with a focus in marketing. While attending undergraduate school at University of Wisconsin-Parkside, I began to write screenplays in my senior year. At first it was for fun, but I quickly learned writing allow me to transfer negative energy into characters I created. This led to a decrease in depressing mood swings, which in turn boosted my quality of life. After undergraduate school in May of 2011, I move to New York City for graduate school. While pursuing my MBA, I continued to write screenplays, but always wanted to write novels as well. I finished graduate school back in the year 2014, but wrote screenplays until I began thinking of my first short film, first First Day Fears. While finishing my fifth feature length screenplay, I started to write my first novel this year. So far, I have finished my first short film and working on my next one (Freedomless Speech), and recently self published my first novel (The Boy Who Could Talk To God) and short stories book (Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Volume 1). My feature length screenplays have been put on temporary hold to finish my short films and books, but I am making good progress on my sixth feature length screenplay. With year 2017 ending, I am currently writing my novel Precinct 86 and Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Vol. 2. I have started teaching myself photography and will pursuing that by summer of 2018, along with my videography, podcast later on, and more research for my documentary.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s