GENDER ENCOURAGEMENT: WHY AREN’T GIRLS PUSHED LIKE BOYS IN SCHOOL

Photo of Four Girls Wearing School Uniform Doing Hand Signs

“We need them as much as we need us.”


girls! girls! girls!

In schools, we have always encouraged the boys more than we have encouraged the girls. When the hard work must be put in, we have always told the boys, this is what you should be doing. Then leave the less strenuous work for the girls. And that is a major aspect of why boys have become more successful than girls over time in school. And also in life the boys have gone off to do great things because you have to be pushed. You have to deal with a great deal of hardships and go through some suffering and pain.

lean in

Current Chief Operating Officer of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg wrote a book about why we should push young girls, why young girls don’t get the same encouragement as boys, and why girls become women who are not prepared for the world ahead. In an article written in 2013 for ABC news entitled, “Top 10 Facts You Don’t Know About Girls’ Education,” a list of reasons was outlined as to the effects young girls deal with on a daily.

  1. 65 million girls are not in school globally
  2. Of the 123 million young people between ages 15 – 24 that can’t read or write, 61% are female.
  3. Half of children not in school living in conflict-ridden countries are 55% girls
  4. Over 70 million children unable to have basic education in world; and over half are girls

giving motivation

How do we get them to be as great as the boys? We first have to start off by not cuddling them more than the boys. And yes, there is a certain softness that men and women have with their daughters than their sons. But we have to be careful how much because the world is not a soft place. And if we are too sensitive, then it’s going to be a culture shock when these girls step into the world.


My Personal Website: www.faheemjackson.squarespace.com

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Author: faheemjackson44

I am from Racine, Wisconsin where I was raised until I graduated high school back in the year 2006. That entire time growing up in my mother's house, I was a student athlete. My goal was to embark on a general business career or athletics. But injuries through sports stopped a sports path, so I decided upon business with a focus in marketing. While attending undergraduate school at University of Wisconsin-Parkside, I began to write screenplays in my senior year. At first it was for fun, but I quickly learned writing allow me to transfer negative energy into characters I created. This led to a decrease in depressing mood swings, which in turn boosted my quality of life. After undergraduate school in May of 2011, I move to New York City for graduate school. While pursuing my MBA, I continued to write screenplays, but always wanted to write novels as well. I finished graduate school back in the year 2014, but wrote screenplays until I began thinking of my first short film, first First Day Fears. While finishing my fifth feature length screenplay, I started to write my first novel this year. So far, I have finished my first short film and working on my next one (Freedomless Speech), and recently self published my first novel (The Boy Who Could Talk To God) and short stories book (Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Volume 1). My feature length screenplays have been put on temporary hold to finish my short films and books, but I am making good progress on my sixth feature length screenplay. With year 2017 ending, I am currently writing my novel Precinct 86 and Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Vol. 2. I have started teaching myself photography since 2018, along with my videography, podcast later on, and more research for my filmmaking.

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