THE DAY OF RECKONING: WILL BLACK PEOPLE EVER GET TO A PLACE PEACE AND PROSPERITY

african american guy, african american man, black guy

“Eventually one day.”


a rough history

Throughout history, the Black population has been a group that has taken a hard punch. But will there ever come a time where it does not exist? Will this large time period 500 years from now, 1,000 years from now be something we look back on and say to ourselves, “How did our ancestors get through it all?” Because I am a strong person, but there are limits to everybody. So what, if any, are the steps we must take within our own community to move past the point of discrimination? Because we are not going to get this entire coming of the minds from another group. So how do we move on going into the future?

shift perception

The idea and expectations for the community must be directed into another path. We are always allowing ourselves to be seen through the lens of another group. Develop a new way of style, talk, viewpoint, that is indicative of who we are. Because no other group has any vested interest in us doing anything with our lives. So the first step is radiating what is special and internal outward about yourself.Once the perception of self changes it is then on to other changes.

tap into skills

When you look at sports and entertainment, the highest ranked people are generally Black people. But what about other areas of interest. What about the Lebron James of the tech industry or the Beyonce of the medical field. We don’t have any global trotters at this moment. We need individuals that are the thinkers in various fields of study. These are the people that impact the next generation like the athletes and entertainers. But the learned of a group of people must stand an express themselves for their natural abilities.

lose the fear

We love to stand out, but fear being free. But as Black people, fear and success can’t occupy the same space. There must be a fearless vigilance for our group. Stand up proud to be smart, intelligent, and productive. And push heavy for what is yours. And when people call you arrogant, go harder. Enough of the days when you refuse to raise your hand in class so as to not appear like a know it all, but also afraid to be wrong. We have to stand and show out; in the most positive way.


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THE PARIAH PEOPLE: WHY WERE BLACK PEOPLE CHOSEN TO BE THIS PARIAH IN HISTORY

Man's Face

“Chosen, yet why?”


the history

The African American population has inhabited the United States since the original Africans were brought to America in the early 1600’s. And since then there has been consistent discrimination. But my question would be, “Why our group?” There has never been major invasions globally of African people conquering people and destroying their culture. When was the last time anyone of African descent invaded a country and robbed them of their resources? Or better yet, show the recent evidence of the African on European, or African on Asian, or African on Australian genocide. It has not happened yet we are more disliked than groups who doled out the actions throughout history.

not about “us” but about “us”

When the Americas’ was in the process of being built. Or better yet, when the land was being sought for control by Europeans from Natives, we weren’t here. What was the decision behind the groups being chosen. Were other groups taken into consideration when looking to build this new land? Well, for one, Africa and Europe are so close, especially the groups that took part in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Another aspect of the chosen group would be who has the least ability to defend ones self. The technology was at a higher scale for that of Europeans for the time period. So being able to thwart off an enemy was more difficult for Africans. Ethnic conflicts that existed between tribes in Africa that didn’t exist in close European groups aided in the exploitation of groups of Africans. The numbers of people who were in close proximity to Europe was an advantage as well. But also, trying to use Europeans for slaves would have been impossible considering the owners were White. Difficult to establish a system where Whites are in power, subjugating Whites without a buffer group.

psychological takeover

There was one point in time where a 16 year girl could marry a 30 year old man. But that is considered statutory rape with a minor today. Yet we don’t have a special group of people who are different from the past. We don’t all of a sudden have morals now, we were just born in a time where that’s not ok. We think it’s our morale, yet when you’re born a system on this is how things work, it shapes our point of views and perspectives. So the systemic construct was this group is this way, this is how you shall feel about them. Meaning for the longest time, Black people were considered 75% people and 25% property. How do you convince an entire society that a person is only three-quarters human? You place science behind it, considering the average person is laymen and not well-educated they follow those who appear to have the extensive knowledge.

Here is where that logic fell apart, it was illegal for Black people to read. An offense that was nearly worse than escaping from a plantation. 75% human, but so much fear in letting a person read. It’s because they weren’t 75%, they were 100% and reading could make you aware of the intertwined construct. But outside the science, is the idea of the dominant learned ones in power knowing more than ourselves. We follow to a great degree what those in higher position think and feel because we “perceive” them to be better or more learned than self. Especially if the system we are living under is working. We say, “It may be wrong, but it’s working.” “So they must be doing something right.”

the control of ones likeness

I have watched countless videos of people giving their perspective on Blacks in America from outside the country. And somewhere in the video, they are asked why they feel this way. And time and time again it has always been, “It’s what we seen on television/cinema/music/etc.” So I think to myself, are we this really hated group, or is it that the world knows what is shown to them. Because close to 100% of people outside America will never come in contact with us (Black people) here in America. And since Black people in America are so communal, we rarely leave our neighborhoods. So the only insight into who were are comes through the medium of T.V. and film. Yet we are not the major exporters of our likeness globally. And that is almost an even bigger problem than issues here in America. The need to have a say in self is very important. We are the only group where another group tells the world at large who we are without the input of that group. And that is something that shall be curbed. But it must be curbed by the people themselves. And when I say people I mean Black people. It shall never be left up to White men and women to interpret us to the world, that is our job. You never look to another group for affirmation as to who you are as a person. Because your likeness will be expressed based on how I see you, not necessarily based on who you are as a group.


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UNAPOLOGETICALLY BLACK: WHAT DOES THE WORD TRULY MEAN

Woman in Brown and Gray T-shirt Sitting on Brown Wooden Table

“Say it loud, I’m Black and I’m proud.”


me being me

The historical landscape of Black people in america has taken on so many faces over time. But there was one (face) that popped up in the 1960’s with a phrase coined by singer James Brown, “Say it loud, I’m Black and I’m proud.” And sense then Black people have found means of making ourselves stand out in a positive manner. Well, why did that term come to be in America? When that song was written, we are talking the height of the Civil Rights Movement. So as a means to uplift the people going through social strife in this country, James Brown came out with this song.

why unapologetic

The term “Unapologetically Black” is used because anytime we show any sense of pride in ourselves it is shot down. No one seems to come out of the wood-work when it’s negative. Meaning, inner cities of high crime, single parent households, and poverty exist, yet no one has a plan or solution to do anything. Black people galvanize to fix the issue, and we are immediately labeled as being separate. Or there is a way to say poverty is not a Black issue it’s an issue of everyone, so as to deflect from the group that has the highest crime and poverty in America. It’s a reason to not have to address the issue in the community. Or drugs is not a Black problem, it’s everyone’s problem, meanwhile narcotics is rampant in Black communities. So when we create an agenda geared toward the community, it’s us not being for the country, yet if we don’t try to fix the problem, who will.

where is it coming from

We hear the naysayers, but who are they really? Because if you look at the Black community, the opposite of us has been White America. Meaning, who has been on the other end of Black criticism; White America? Who have we had our strife with throughout history, White America? But let’s put this into its proper context  and perspective when we say White America. Because the majority of White people could care less about Black people coming into communities cleaning up the negative aspects of the community. White America could care less about Black people taking pride in their appearance, their mind-frame, and/or their financial conditions. But the face has long been White, which is something that creates the disconnect. Our vague existence in America keeps us in constant strife with “White America” but who really? “White America” is very vague, but for so long, and even today a White face is connected. And it’s the social construct of Black and White that creates the constant issues.

trek along

There is never a day you should sacrifice yourself for the comfort of another person. If you go to work, raise your family, contribute to society, where is the need to be apologetic in the first place. Live, and if your hue and your existence is too much for another person it’s their problem. I never say, “Unapologetically Black,” because even having to say it means you’re trying to prove a point to a person not worth proving the point to. Live, grow, and prosper; leave the naysayers behind.


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AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN: HOW DOES THE MOTHER LAND VIEW US HERE USING THE TERM

Men And Women Wit Kids

“Same color different culture.”


from there here we are

I have always wondered what do Africans think of the term African Americans. Because that term describing Black people in America is actually a young term that was coined not as early as the 1980’s. How do they view the idea of us in America using the word African? Because yes, so many of us are descendants of African slaves forced over in the 1600’s. But what are their thoughts today regarding the wording? And from my understanding it’s an on the fence viewpoint. Because the are Africans who embrace, others reject it.

culture versus ethnicity

There is no doubt where we (Black People) come from as a group. Black people didn’t evolve in this country. We an’t pinpoint the exact area of Africa, but what are the differences between us and them. The obvious are the different cultural ways of life. Black people in America culture comes from the relationship with this country, Africans come from what they created on the continent of Africa. When it comes to ethnicity, our ethnicity in America is unknown because that aspect of us was lost. But overseas in Africa, they held on to their identity. So ethnicity is subject for debate while culture is different.

the struggles we share

There is something we share, and it is not necessarily a good thing. There have been many problems and fights for Africans and us here in America. Africa had their version of Jim Crow, and have had their own civil rights movements. There are slight variations that make our struggles and movements  different.

sights and sounds

When looking at the clothes and listening to the music in Africa, you can’t help but acknowledge where a lot of music in America came from. What’s interesting is that so many musicians don’t even study African tribal music, yet the beats are close to the beats overseas. It’s almost as if this something that we as Black people in America inherited. That ear for song and dance has stuck with us in America.


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BLACK DOLLARS LOST: WHY THE BLACK COMMUNITY MAY BE FINANCIALLY POOR

black-and-white, close-up, face

“A few trillion, yet broke.”


the community

The African American community has is a financial base that constitutes roughly $2.5 trillion dollars of the American economy. But when you look as a whole, there is still a high level of poverty that exist within the communities throughout the country. And what are some of the driving forces behind the poverty. There are skeptics that will have a wide range of feelings. Views like Black people being shut out of business ownership to we as a community spending our money on things not making us better. So in my opinion, I have a few things that I have noticed from our end that can be done. Because the expectations of the system is not going to happen.

goods #1 (cars)

Walking home from a long day, I come across two neighborhoods here in New York City. One of them is the Upper Eat Side and the other being Harlem. The Upper East Side is a more expensive side of Manhattan which consists of highly priced brownstones and penthouse apartments. Both property types sharing the community with high end stores that can only be described as the Rodeo drive of New York City. Then there is Harlem, which is a large neighborhood stretching from 100th street all the up into the high 160’s. This is where you start to see more working class and poor families. A historic region of the borough, you instantly notice two aspects of both communities. There is that the Upper East Side is mostly White and Harlem is mostly Black. But the other is the money spent on goods and services.

I can’t help but notice walking past a housing project to see Mercedes Benz, BMW, Lexus, and Jaguar in the parking lot. Yet the upscale Upper East Side I see Toyota, Dodge, Nissan, and Ford. Why the stark difference in vehicles considering the community poor should be driving what the wealthy drive, and the wealthy should be driving what the poor drive. And here lies an underlying problem. Why is one living in the housing projects, yet driving a luxury vehicle? There are some really nice Chryslers, GM’s, Honda, Lincolns, and Audi’s. A car that has a price tag of a luxury vehicle when living in public housing has no real value because it’s not a real investment.

goods part 2 (clothing)

I know for myself growing up in a poor Black community, that carrying yourself in a certain manner in respect to how you dress is emphasized. But there is a clear difference between dressing to be presentable and dressing far outside what you are able to afford. Growing up in my community was like a runaway fashion show of every latest trend you can imagine. But I on the other hand attended predominantly White schools. And the dressing style was vastly different. It was nice and presentable, yet parents were not going too deep into their wallets. And these were children who could easily afford to wear expensive clothing. So when you have a closet that is easily mistaken for a high end fashion showroom and you’re poor, this can be a contributor to the problem as well.

education

Within our community there is still a high rate of a lack of education. I am not just talking about going to school education. I am also referring to the literacy when looking at money. Because in order to remove yourself from poverty you have to clean your mind and reintroduce new information. And from there. build for years off the new information until you get to the next level. And having financial literacy will aid you trying to build toward something stable. Interestingly enough, you will not learn that in college. It comes with years of at times making mistakes until you get the hang of it.


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GUILTY NO MATTER WHAT: ARE BLACK MEN EVER GIVEN THE BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT

african american guy, african american man, black guy

“Why do good?”


born black

As a young Black male, I grew up in the Midwest. Watching a lot of things take place around me, there was something I saw that I rarely talked about until I became and adult. And that is that there is never a real due process for Black males. You are guilty no matter what and if you are innocent the court system got it wrong. And it makes you wonder, what the hell is the purpose of being good, if everyone still thinks you’re bad.  And there are so many places to start when I say still looked at as bad.

court systems

Guilty, “Good, the system did what it was supposed to do.” Innocent, “How the hell did the court get this one wrong.” And you think to yourself, what is driving the idea that it’s always a guilty. And with that, you almost think what’s the purpose of even going to a trial. You already know the outcome. I think that’s why O.J. Simpson’s case was so big at the time. It was because this Black man was found not guilty, even though inevitably people on both sides eventually would think of him as guilty. The country was split, so split, people went as far as not speaking to anyone who believed in the other side.

relationships

When it comes to dating, we are seen as these attractive men outside of Black women almost behind closed doors. But the moment it’s publicly outside of that, then things get a little uncomfortable. But in all, we still have this aspect of guilt that lingers over our heads. That look, the look that is given to you when someone feels you have committed a crime or done something else wrong. So you stand still, trying to piece together what is is that you have done, if anything.

real or fake

Is what I have been saying a reality, or just a stretch. The above feelings are sentiments that so many Black males feel. Now, do I feel this way on a daily basis no. I have never felt like a bad guy dating or in society. But I guess everyone’s reality is different than my own.


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IN DEFENSE OF OUR OWN: WHY DO BLACK PEOPLE JUMP TO DEFEND OTHERS OF COLOR

Photo of Four Persons Uniting Hands

“Why we do it.”


on the defensive

Coolest Monkey in the Jungle was the phrase on the hoodie of a young Black child in an H&M ad this year. African Americans, not many others, but us in America took offense. Now what’s interesting is that the boy’s mother pushed back against the backlash. She stated that, “She was not offended, and it’s her son.” So you have to think to yourself as an African American, why are Image result for coolest monkey in the junglewe so quick to jump to the defense of other melanin people? Even when the people themselves are willing to distance themselves from our defense of them. Is it because we don’t want the image of ourselves to be lumped into the Black that accept these labels? Or could it be we understand the issues of that child wearing that hoodie, or any other situation?

i’m me and you’re you

African Americans tend to want to jump to the defense of others that look like us worldwide. But let’s observe the lack of wanting to be connected. We share the same skin color as so many others, but why are we looked as different. Could it be that color is merely social constructs that are different other places? Or, are we looked at because of culture in America and not ethnicity? Because I have heard Africans state that we are no where near the same. But where did we come from, outer space? It’s culture that creates the you versus me; even though a lot of our culture here in America is adopted even places of others tend to see us in a different light.

fall back, let them be

As African Americans, we are too quick to jump and defend. And at times, are looked at with this disdain when we ourselves feel we are helping. So you have to start to say to yourself, “I’m going to fall back off of this one.” “Let them be, and deal with the issues on their own.” Because jumping up and defending may not always be the solution, especially if we’re going to be looked at like, “Oh, we’re not you, and you are not us.” Yet, when White men and women attack issues effecting Black people outside America, it’s embraced. And if that is seen as not true, it feels deep down that there is a difference. So what we need to do is go, you know what, let’s see how this plays out.

i’m deeply thankful

On the flip-side of not wanting to connect, you still have those that appreciate the push to help. When the London bombing took place last year and leaders from around the world gathered, I thought to myself, you rarely if ever see this as a result of terrorists attacks in Africa. It’s because to so many, ” that’s what they do.” To speak up and say something by an ethnic group that Woman in Multicolored Halter Dress Carrying Childbares the resemblance, knowing your struggles being melanin and few care is important. But I guess to each is own when standing up for another person.


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