MEMORANDUM: WHY WE SHOULD APPRECIATE OUR TROOPS

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“Stand with them, not just for them.”


Tomorrow is Memorial Day, which is the celebration for our men and women who wear the uniform of our armed forces. The men and women who perform a thankless job for protecting this country. Those who are called to war, not because we tell them to do so, but because they feel it is their core belief. And like I said before, a thankless job. Whenever a professional sports team win a championship, there is a celebration in the streets. Yet when our armed forces return home, it’s usually a family member to greet them. We rarely celebrate their coming home, why? Why do we just take it for granted?

When these men and women return home we look at them like, “Oh, that’s what you’re supposed to do for me.” “You’re supposed to want to die for me living in the comforts of my living room.” All the while, they are being shot at in some foreign country they’ve never been to; on terrain they’ve never seen Image result for troops homebefore. But nonetheless, they do their duty and come home. We give them half off on a Memorial Day brunch and say we did our part. But what about a little more. Why not take this time instead to push for programs that will aid in their matriculation back into society? They most likely have spent time, for the ones who fought, shooting and killing. Now they’re supposed to come back home and live a normal life.

How do we expect them to live normal if we don’t assist? Their duty has been to fight, but what is ours? If someone is willing to say, “I am fighting because it’s my duty.” Why not help them out with something? I’m not saying it necessarily has to be of monetary value. I’m talking more of Image result for homeless troopspsychological treatment. Because if their minds are right, then they can earn their own livings and live a normal life. If any candidates are qualified for free health care it should be armed forces who fought in foreign wars. And that help should be mental. Or better yet, someone who lost a limb and is now disabled. They walk the streets, and people stare, not knowing what they sacrificed.

And the other reason why they deserve it is because we spend so much money on foreign aid to other nations. Yet we let the men and women who give their lives fighting for us nothing.  If a hurricane wipes out a village in some foreign land we hold telethons and major events. But none of the like when troops come home from war. So, in the end, we should take care of our own before assisting others. In America unless there is a draft, you have the freedom to join willingly. That shouldn’t mean, you join, it’s your problem. Why do we treat it like it’s a punishment instead of something to commend. It not only should, but must change. Otherwise we lose a piece of our identity as a nation.


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Author: faheemjackson44

I am from Racine, Wisconsin where I was raised until I graduated high school back in the year 2006. That entire time growing up in my mother's house, I was a student athlete. My goal was to embark on a general business career or athletics. But injuries through sports stopped a sports path, so I decided upon business with a focus in marketing. While attending undergraduate school at University of Wisconsin-Parkside, I began to write screenplays in my senior year. At first it was for fun, but I quickly learned writing allow me to transfer negative energy into characters I created. This led to a decrease in depressing mood swings, which in turn boosted my quality of life. After undergraduate school in May of 2011, I move to New York City for graduate school. While pursuing my MBA, I continued to write screenplays, but always wanted to write novels as well. I finished graduate school back in the year 2014, but wrote screenplays until I began thinking of my first short film, first First Day Fears. While finishing my fifth feature length screenplay, I started to write my first novel this year. So far, I have finished my first short film and working on my next one (Freedomless Speech), and recently self published my first novel (The Boy Who Could Talk To God) and short stories book (Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Volume 1). My feature length screenplays have been put on temporary hold to finish my short films and books, but I am making good progress on my sixth feature length screenplay. With year 2017 ending, I am currently writing my novel Precinct 86 and Faheem Jackson Short Story Collection Vol. 2. I have started teaching myself photography and will pursuing that by summer of 2018, along with my videography, podcast later on, and more research for my documentary.

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