RACIALLY CONSCIOUS: HOW BEING IMPARTIAL IN A DIVIDED NATION CAN BE TOUGH

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“It exist, but to what degree?”


Growing up in the Midwestern state of Wisconsin, I never really thought about race. And when I say race, I’m not referring to the human race. I’m talking about being an African American male. I could visibly tell the students in school were different than myself, yet it was not much of a discussion. The schools were predominantly White, while I grew up in a majority Black and Hispanic neighborhood. I would hear things regarding issues with being Black. I heard how people would say it was harder to get employment, going to certain schools, or even dating in monogamous relationships. Yet it never quite sunk into my mind, until I got older. And that’s when the experiences started to take hold in my life.

Experiences ranging from looking throughout my childhood at how the teacher student relationship was different with the White students versus the Black students. Or even how walking up the street I noticed non-Black people were put off by my presence. But still, the relationships I had with students in school was quite enjoyable. No one treated the other person like an outsider. And all the kids in school would go over each other’s house on the weekends. So what was it that so many people were talking about really? Well, I began to see once leaving my mother’s house going to an out-of-state-college.

I attended two universities, the first being in the state of South Carolina. The school was a historically Black College in Columbia, South Carolina and most of the students came from the south. Attending this school was actually a culture shock because even though we were all the same ethnic group, I didn’t quite seem to fit in. And that’s when I realized, that even though I grew up in a majority Black community, I didn’t spend much time in the community. With so much going on that my mother didn’t want me apart of, I was in school and sports. So what happened, oddly enough, is that I lost a connection with other Black students at the school.

Feeling homesick, I returned back to Wisconsin to attend a university about twenty minutes from where I grew up. This rural campus was attended by multiple ethnic groups of students. It would be the campus where I graduated. But, while back in Wisconsin, I had a situation one time where I was eating in the cafeteria. Seeing a young White male I went to middle school with, we got our lunch and headed toward a table. Then I noticed a situation I had never come in contact with before. One table had mostly Asian students, one table had all Black kids, the Hispanics sat together, and the White kids sat together. My friend and I walked near a table that was mostly White, and for the first time in my life I felt uncomfortable.

Growing up, my mother raised me with the impression that you had to deal with every group of people. Yet now, I was forced to make a racial decision. Everyone else sat with what made them comfortable, but what was I to do in this space. So, for me, throughout undergrad, I kept my distance from a lot of people. And actually, I never really experienced a college life. But even after college, and entering graduate school, I started to see more of a divide. But not only the divide, but how important it is in society. I have sense taken on views that are different than how my mother raised me.

One of which is the idea of interracial dating. Growing up, I probably would have said sure, but seeing the strain of an interracial relationship, I’m not sure I could handle it. I couldn’t handle the family tension, nor making the woman choose me or her existence. My views changed where I live because I still live in a Black neighborhood. That feeling of safety is why I have decided to stay. That common bond that you share with the people. And it’s a whole lot easier socially as well. Yet I am trapped between how I was raised and the society I live in today. I was raised to be more impartial, but that’s not my life experience in our country.

And in the end, no matter how you’re raised you have to live in this society. It’s great to have these idealistic views of the world, yet they are not fully true. It shouldn’t, but ethnicity matters: where you live, who you date, friends you tend to make, and how you view society. It’s an imperfect society, but it’s the only society we have. Do I see it changing, maybe, but not in the foreseeable future.


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PARENTAL BEHAVIOR: WHY YOU SHOULD WATCH HOW YOU VERBALLY COMMUNICATE RESPECT TO THE OTHER PARENT

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“They see and hear everything, so be careful how you speak.”


For me growing up, I saw my mother and father have disagreements. Not understanding at my age that arguing between adults is normal; especially when children are involved. And the way you communicate those disagreements have a major impact on young kids, all the way into their adulthood. So with that said, how should parents go about channeling their emotions, especially when the kids are in the vicinity? What are key mistakes that adults make when trying to win an argument over the other person? Or not just an argument, but what about the upper hand. Is it always important to win an argument, or is it best sometimes to just walk away? Let’s observe mistakes both men and women make during disagreements.

As it pertains to the man, we make some errors when trying to win over an argument. One of the more common errors is using our ability to go higher in yelling in an argument. Men are physically stronger, we’re known to dominate over the conversation. We take this dominance stance to show that we are the ones in control. It’s this nature driven response, especially if we fill we are losing control of the argument. But the biggest mistake we make is trying to use vulgar language to get our point across. Using expletives, especially calling the mother out of her name, is such a deflating and quick route to take in winning the conversation. But let me remind you, this isn’t a one way street.

On the part of the woman, the clear mistakes that a woman make is number one, belittling the father. Especially, when children are around, it sends a dangerous message that there is a clear lack of respect for the father. It also lets the kid see how they can behave when they get emotional as well. But another clear mistake women make is saying that these are their kids. Removing the father from the equation as if they have no voice in raising kids, just because she gave birth. This also sends a message that you have no real purpose. Just the person who provided the other DNA that the child is endowed with. After that, you don’t have a real duty or obligation, except to be the financial contributor.

Now, as it pertains to the children in the situation, they are watching and listening to both of you. And based on how you two communicate, the children can use this verbal communication to their advantage. And while the parents bicker between the two of them, the kid is able to live their lives how they see fit. Until something bad takes place, and both parents are left with their hands in the air because it’s partly their fault. While they were busy arguing and fighting, there was no guidance in the kid’s life because the two parents wanted to prove each other wrong. In the end, that’s the main reason there needs to be a civil form of communication between parents. Not just for the sake of their relationship, but for the child/children who may be nearby; watching and listening.


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A LONG STANDING DIVIDE: HOW POLICE AND COMMUNITY BICKERING EFFECT THE UNITED STATES

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“The divide that can cause a collapse.”


In the recent years the topic of police brutality has come up in America. But on the other side police advocates are stating that they are just doing their jobs. Now my question is, is this really a problem, or because we have so much social media access, it’s bigger now? Because this has always been going on (the relationship between the community and police), but now it’s bigger because we can instantly see the problem. Now, previously I said community. The bad blood is not in just any community, it’s the predominantly Black community. This has been a long standing relationship in this country for decades. Longer than I have been alive, my parents, and grandparents.

But my topic today is not to discuss why it goes on or who is to blame. My topic today covers how it could ultimately effect the country. You might ask how so; how could the community and police relationship effect America? Image result for criminalityFor starters, it will give rise to the criminality in society. Once the police become pariahs, then the criminal element is able to take more control. With the relationship fragmented, they have more voice. Because the community’s way of punishing the cops is to make their job hard by not cooperating. And the police become fed up and allow the criminals to reign supreme over law abiding citizens.

And think about what it does to a younger generation when watching all this television coverage. A age group is growing up witnessing killings before their very eyes. Now, they will grow to have an even higher level of disdain for the police than previous generations. Just think about it, posted videos of the shootings on top of a 24 hour news cycle. We are engineering a Related imagegeneration where you are made to fear those sent to protect you. Imagine growing up a young Black male right now in elementary school. Nothing but live coverage of Black males shot by cops. The respect and trust in the law will diminish. And you’ll create a new era of rogue individuals in our society.

Lastly, what about keeping our borders safe in America. We live in a country where terrorist threats from outside are all around us. So when we have in-fighting, it can put us in a very vulnerable situation. Police officers are our first line of defense in case of a terrorist attack. So if the community and police are fighting that is an in for outsiders. For instance, while the people and police fight, the real threat could be operating within the community. We are so programmed in America to watch each other, we’re not watching outsiders. What’s more interesting is that outsiders see us as more of a collective than we see ourselves.

In the end, having fighting between the community and the police is more of a problem than issues within. We have to to now make sure that people from outside don’t use this against us. Because no matter what the fight, there can’t be fighting between the citizens, and the men and women hired to protect them. This nation becomes too susceptible to homegrown and outside potential threats. So what is the solution because this is not some fly by night problem. It has been a long-standing issue for generations. But whatever the case may be, continuing will create a divide that only hurts the people and law enforcement. Thus giving rise to real outside threats.


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