STEPH CURRY WHO! HATER OR HATE: THE DOWNSIDE OF BEING GREAT AT WHAT YOU DO

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“What is it about greatness that people hate so much?”


Recent news of NBA basketball player Stephen Curry’s troubles with other NBA players have surfaced. He is unaware of why so many have such disdain toward him considering he pays homage to the greats. But where does it all really come from. The guys who have these issues with Curry are just as great if not greater, so what is it? There are a few reasons as to why Curry deals with such issues and other men and women like him in society. The reasons are envy, fear, and the other is having to rise to an occasion that someone else has risen to in their personal or professional persona. So what does that really mean?

Well, for starters the envy that is creeping up comes from the idea that some of the guys who don’t care for Curry were top dogs when he came into the league. Now that he is the bigger name, now he is seen as some form of competition of threat. But instead of competing and letting that do the talk, it turns into something much more. The problem with that is that you can become so wrapped up in your disdain for someone else you start to fall off your game. It’s kind of like the issues comedian Kevin Hart have had in recent years. When he came in the comedy world he was little Kev, now he’s above all the guys who were like mentors to him. Some people get comfortable with you in a certain space and can’t see past that. Then you shoot past that point, and all the haters comes into play.

But is it the haters or is it hate. And the hate brings me to my next reason why people have disdain and that is the fear. The fear of you doing something better than them forcing them to step up their game up. Or, some people don’t have the ability, but instead of asking you, they sink deeper. They are in fear that someone will be better than them and don’t want to focus on them. They are so engaged in what you’re doing that they lose out in life. But is that the only reason why so many people have issues with someone who has done nothing to them? Why do people have so many Steph Curry issues with other successful people? It’s also the personal as well as the professional.

Which brings me to my last point, and that is the persona you carry in society. Steph Curry carries himself well in society which also makes people not like him. When you’re a public figure and your public image is so good, not just from some PR stunt, but you’re the real person, you’re hated. They would love nothing more than to see you fail. Why, well because everyone is always expecting you to be this good guy as well. They say things like, “You should be more like this guy.” “This guy would never do anything like what you just did/do.” People don’t want to rise to the occasion of being a certain type of guy, so they show disdain toward the good guy.

See, in the end, people will always have a reason not to like someone they perceive to be in a position of status. And if you’re a good guy, then people really don’t like you. I wrote something similar earlier in past posts where if you’re always good, they can’t connect to you because you don’t have a smudge. It’s the same thing that happened to Tom Brady, Tiger Woods, and many others. People love to see some type of crash so they can say I told you so or this person is just as messed up as myself. You will never be able to understand these people, and most likely you don’t ever want to understand them.


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LAVARTHERHOOD: WHY PEOPLE ARE SO UPSET OVER CONFIDENT PARENTING

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“What’s the big deal?”


The above photograph is of a father who has three sons. One in college who is a rising NBA prospect and two other young sons highly ranked in high school. But them being ranked high is not the topic of discussion. The real discussion is how one should bring up their children in society. Lavar Ball has been in sports news recently because he admitted that he feels his son Lonzo Ball, a standout basketball player at UCLA and prospective NBA draft pick,  is better than current NBA star Stephen Curry. Sports reporters came from every outlet possible stating how much they disagree with his stance. But most of all, they are critical of how he has thrust himself into the spotlight. But the more I hear Lavar speak, the more something interesting comes to mind.

Lavar Ball was born and raised in South Central Los Angeles. For those of you who are unfamiliar with South Central Los Angeles, it has long been a community of gangs, crime, single parent households, and poverty. Coincidentally enough, the time period when Lavar was in high school, is when Crack Cocaine was first introduced to Los Angeles. Plenty of young Black males were getting involved in the drug trade, many Lavar’s age. Yet Lavar focused himself on sports. So much so, it granted him collegiate attention. And with the birth of his sons in his late twenties into his thirties, he began to instill that competitive edge he once had himself in sports. Well, what does any of this have to do with parenting?

Back to the area where Lavar is from in Los Angeles. South Central is a place where having both parents in the household is more of a luxury in life. So seeing a Black male in the lives of his sons given his background you would think it would mean something. Not so, well why? Because me personally, I think it’s great that a father instills the confidence to make them believe they can beat the best of the best. People are angry as if to say. “Who do you think you are, expecting so much from your sons!” But shouldn’t he expect more from them? Isn’t this what we should be doing as parents? I thought parents are supposed to feel their children are the best. Why is having excessive confidence in your child a bad thing?

What is a man like Lavar to do? Say, “Hey, of course he (Stephen Curry) can beat my son.” Or, “Hey I would say my son could play just fine.” You’re supposed to think your son can beat anyone, even the greats. Especially in a country where so few expectations are held for the young Black males. So to see a Black man pushing his sons in the right direction, shouldn’t this be encouraged? But also, weren’t all fathers like this decades ago? Every father pushed their kids, especially their sons. But we have become such a sensitive society, that Lavar is seen as problematic. If this were thirty plus years ago, no one would even care that Lavar had even made the statement.

You see, in the end, fathers are supposed to think the most of their children. You’re supposed to not only think your son can beat Curry, but can catch Kareem Abdul Jabbar as well (who currently holds the NBA record for most points in NBA history). But with confidence and pride comes criticism today. Winning has taken a backseat to losing or being equal in society. Mediocrity has become the new trend in America. Where the men and women in power want you to remain mundane, while they hold the majority of power. Remember Marianne Williamson, “When you let your own light shine, you will unconsciously give others permission to do the same.” “For when you are liberated from your own fears, you will automatically liberate others around you.”