APPROPRIATORS: WHEN CULTURAL APPROPRIATION FEELS UNCOMFORTABLE

“When it goes bad.”


cultural appropriation

What is cultural appropriation? Well, cultural apprpriation is when someone of another culture adopts the look of someone elses’ and writes it off as their own. Now, do they do this on purpose, or is this a blunder that draws criticism?Related image

how it becomes problematic

To me, I don’t think people are doing things that will purposely remove the element of the group. But when are you of a dominant group and where something this tends to happen. For instance if you are a White American.

If you are a White American and wear your hair in corn rows because you might have seen a well-known Black celebrity or friend of yours in this style. Then you draw criticism because now, it’s called boxer braids when you sport it.

Image result for cultural appropriation
Image courtesy of artist: Shannon Wright 

Not only does the name change, but the connotation that comes with it. Because when African Americans do it, it’s considered unprofessional or a thug mentality. But it’s a breakthrough when White Women do it. Is this a lot of White women’s fault, no.

We live in a country where the mainstream media picks up on something and they exploit it more than the single female herself. They push the narrative and it becomes all the rage. Like Miley Cyrus twerking. This was popularized by Black female strippers, but she does it and it becomes the dance of the year.

what do people expect

We all are very protective of our cultures, especially when someone on the outside does something that mirrors what we do. Yet, like I said before, it’s not an intentional move to remove a group’s credibility. And to be honest, it wouldn’t matter if someone does give the proper respect. Society may still run with whoever they like in the end.

But also outside of the giving of just do, you can’t also get made when someone from the outside wears something that they find stylish, but society places a different guideline for the look. Like a Miley Cyrus twerking video. She could say all day where she got it, Kim Kardashian could say corn rows; views will be views.

Yo have to change a social construction of the ideologies behind the differences. You can address the person doing all day, but it’s out of their hands. They (appropriators) can show respect all day, the view is different in the eyes of masses because how people perceive another group of people. Meaning Kim K is not viewed in the same light as when a Black woman in corn rows because the “negative image” of Black women has to shift.


My Personal Website: www.faheemjackson.squarespace.com

Instagram Me: @theefaheemjackson

Twitter Me: @2320howe

Medium.com/@faheemjackson

Tumblr Me: @fjackson44

Facebook Fan Page: www.facebook.com

CULTURAL APPROPRIATION: WE ALL DO IT, WHY THE UPSET

Related image

“Is there a double standard?”

Over the recent years, I have heard more and more about cultural appropriation. The question of who is allowed to do what. Am I ripping someone off, or am I admiring someone? Which means paying homage to where you got it from, but how many people actually do that? For me at least, I see a lot of styles that African Americans have made popular. It has been considered persona non grata, but worn by someone White and it’s a fashion statement. But, is this something that we all do, or just centralized to a certain ethnic group of people. Well, let’s take a look at the different groups of people.

The African American population for starters are a group where music, dance, and clothing style has influenced generations of young people. Not only Black youth, but youth from a variety of other ethnic groups as well. Yet we still have the appropriates of the styles and claimImage result for cornrows it as their own. There has been a term for the name of these people and they’re called Culture Vultures. They come in and consume the parts that they want and toss out the rest. So instead of calling a hair braided technique Cornrows, the name has been changed to Boxer Braids. The name is changed and yet there is no conversation as to where it came from; almost like it doesn’t matter. It does when the group it is being taken from is told they are not innovators of any style. Yet the style is used later on by an outside group.

Is it just African American? What about the Hispanic population, are there any cultural identifiers they have that people adopt. And my answer is absolutely. I have noticed that a lot of people from the west coast over the years have taken on the Cholo and Chola look. What is this look? It’s what Image result for cholo lookhas been popularized by west coast hip hop artists. Flannels, Dickies pants, shorts and long tube socks, Chuck Taylors, hair nets, with hair slicked back. A look that the Hispanic community has popularized is more than just some hip style. It has more meaning to the group, but to everyone else, it’s the cool thing to do. So how come no one is open into talking about all of these non-Chicanos adopting the style as their own, or showing disrespect by trivializing it.

No one says much about it, unless you’re Chicano. But, what about White Americans. Wait a minute, what I meant tImage result for guido blowouto say was, what about Italian, Irish, Greek, etc. I have always seen people dressing up in traditional Irish garb, who are not Irish. I have seen people styled in the Guido culture of Italians. Even people dressed in togas, but how does the Greek community feel regarding this appropriation. But unlike minority groups, people who fall under the category of European don’t typically get upset over the appropriation. Is it because their cultures are not strong enough to take over. Or is it because that they are typically the majority so it does not encapsulate them like it does someone else?

In the end, we all take a little bit from someone else. Even at times not knowing where it came from. Yet that is what it all comes down to in life. Who created what and who gets the credit for what. But most of all, are the creators being replaced by the popularity of the group using it next.